Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

flag Barbados Trademark Registration

Get a free search

Basic Availability Report & Our Offer to your email in 24 hours.

Ready in a business day
Over 100.000 searches completed
Free search - no obligation
$1599 €1491 £1292 ¥11307
One class

Register your Trademark

Hire our local trademark attorneys to file your trademark for registration. Take advantage of our easy, fast & efficient process.

  • Experienced attorneys in every country
  • Competitive prices with zero hidden fees
  • 5000+ happy clients & many testimonials
  • Unlimited support throughout the process
  • Personal account manager dedicated to your success

Get a Trademark in Barbados

Submit an online form in order to request your trademark registration. You can pay later or have your personal consultant check your form first.

Complete 4 steps in 7 minutes
  • Current Contacts info
  • Trademark info
  • Additional services
  • Complete
  • Review and Submit

Other Trademark Services

Study

Check if your trademark is available for registration.

The results will resolve any doubts regarding your mark and give you confidence in the outcome of the registration process.

from
$159 €148 £128 ¥1124

Monitoring

Our AI search will constantly monitor Trademark Registers for any similar marks.

We'll manually check the results and regularly deliver reports of any conflicting marks allowing you to enforce your rights.

from
$189 €176 £153 ¥1337

Renewal

Request a cost-effective trademark renewal in 150+ countries, don’t let your trademark expire.

Contact us for our online renewal process.

from
$499 €465 £403 ¥3529

Contact Us

1. Trademark Registration in Barbados

To register a trademark in Barbados, you need to follow these steps:

  1. Conduct a search: Before filing a trademark application, it is recommended to conduct a search to ensure that there are no identical or similar trademarks registered or pending registration in Barbados. This can be done by searching the Barbados Intellectual Property Office (IPO) database.
  2. File a trademark application: Once the search has been completed, you can file a trademark application with the Barbados IPO. The application should include a completed application form, a representation of the trademark, and the filing fee.
  3. Examination and publication: The Barbados IPO will examine the trademark application to ensure that it meets the requirements for registration. If the application is accepted, the trademark will be published in the Barbados Official Gazette for opposition purposes.
  4. Opposition: Any interested party may file an opposition to the trademark within two months of the publication date.
  5. Registration: If there is no opposition or if the opposition is unsuccessful, the trademark will be registered and a certificate of registration will be issued.

The duration of trademark protection in Barbados is ten years from the date of registration, and it can be renewed indefinitely for further ten-year periods.

2. How to register a trademark in Barbados

a. Trademark Registration Process in Barbados.

The trademark registration process in Barbados can be straightforward if you follow the necessary steps and provide all the required information and documentation. However, it can be challenging if you are not familiar with the process and the legal requirements. Here are some factors that could make the trademark registration process in Barbados more difficult:

  1. Similar trademarks: If there are existing trademarks that are identical or similar to your proposed trademark, it could be challenging to register your trademark in Barbados.
  2. Language barriers: The official language of Barbados is English, and all trademark applications must be submitted in English. If you are not proficient in English, it may be challenging to complete the application process.
  3. Legal complexity: The trademark registration process involves legal procedures and requirements that may be difficult to understand if you are not familiar with them. Hiring a trademark attorney or agent in Barbados can help simplify the process and ensure that all requirements are met.
  4. Opposition proceedings: If your trademark application is opposed by another party, the opposition proceedings can be lengthy and costly. It is essential to have a strong legal argument and evidence to defend your trademark application.

Overall, the trademark registration process in Barbados can be manageable with proper guidance and preparation. It is crucial to conduct a trademark search, provide accurate information, and comply with all legal requirements to increase the chances of a successful registration.

b. Types of Trademarks in Barbados.

In Barbados, trademarks can be classified into several types, including:

  1. Word Mark: A word mark consists of words or letters, numerals, or a combination of both that form a distinctive name or logo. Examples of word marks include Coca-Cola, Nike, and Microsoft.
  2. Figurative Mark: A figurative mark consists of a design or image, which can be a drawing, symbol, shape, color, or a combination of these elements. Examples of figurative marks include the Nike Swoosh, the Apple logo, and the Twitter bird.
  3. Three-Dimensional Mark: A three-dimensional mark consists of a shape, packaging, or container that is distinctive and recognizable. Examples of three-dimensional marks include the Coca-Cola bottle, the Toblerone chocolate bar, and the Pringles potato chip canister.
  4. Sound Mark: A sound mark consists of a specific sound that is unique and recognizable, such as a jingle, a musical tune, or a sound effect. Examples of sound marks include the Intel chime, the MGM lion's roar, and the Nokia ringtone.
  5. Color Mark: A color mark consists of a particular color or combination of colors that are distinctive and recognizable. Examples of color marks include the Tiffany blue color, the UPS brown color, and the John Deere green and yellow combination.

It is also possible to register non-traditional marks in Barbados, such as holograms, motion marks, and scent marks. However, the registration requirements and legal standards for these types of trademarks are more complex, and it is advisable to seek legal advice before submitting an application.

c. Registration requirements in Barbados.

To register a trademark in Barbados, the following requirements must be met:

  1. Application form: A completed trademark application form must be submitted to the Barbados Intellectual Property Office (IPO).
  2. Representation of the trademark: A clear representation of the trademark must be included with the application. This can be in the form of a drawing or a digital image.
  3. Applicant information: The name and address of the applicant, as well as their nationality and business activity, must be provided.
  4. Goods and services: The goods and services that the trademark will be used to identify must be specified in the application.
  5. Priority claim: If the applicant has filed a trademark application for the same mark in another country, they can claim priority based on that application.
  6. Power of attorney: A power of attorney is required if the application is being filed by an agent or representative on behalf of the applicant.
  7. Filing fee: The trademark application must be accompanied by the required filing fee.

The trademark must be distinctive and not similar or identical to existing trademarks in Barbados. A search of the Barbados IPO database should be conducted before filing the application to ensure that the proposed trademark is available for registration.

Once the application is submitted, it will be examined by the Barbados IPO to ensure that it meets the legal requirements for registration. If the application is accepted, the trademark will be published in the Barbados Official Gazette for opposition purposes. If there is no opposition or if the opposition is unsuccessful, the trademark will be registered, and a certificate of registration will be issued.

d. Trademark Priority in Barbados. 

In Barbados, trademark priority can be claimed based on a previous application filed in another country that is a member of the Paris Convention or the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS).

If an applicant has filed a trademark application in a Paris Convention or TRIPS member country within six months of the filing date of the Barbados trademark application, they can claim priority based on the earlier application. This means that the filing date of the earlier application will be considered the filing date of the Barbados application for the purpose of determining priority.

To claim priority, the applicant must include a written declaration in the Barbados trademark application that specifies the date and country of the earlier application, as well as the trademark and the goods or services covered by the earlier application. The applicant must also provide a certified copy of the earlier application within three months of the filing date of the Barbados application.

Claiming priority can be useful for ensuring that the applicant has the earliest possible filing date for their trademark in Barbados, which can provide greater protection and stronger rights in case of disputes. However, the priority claim must be made at the time of filing the Barbados trademark application and cannot be added later.

e. Trademark database in Barbados. 

There is no official database maintained by the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) in Barbados. However, you can search for the Barbadian trademarks using third party services or by assistance of a local trademark attorney or agent.

3. Free Trademark Search in Barbados

a. How to perform a detailed trademark search.

Performing a detailed trademark search in Barbados involves searching the trademark database maintained by the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) in Barbados to identify any existing trademarks that may conflict with your proposed trademark. Here are the steps to perform a detailed trademark search in Barbados:

  1. Conduct a search using publicly available databases with keywords or phrases that are similar to your proposed trademark. It is recommended to search for variations of your trademark that may also be similar to existing trademarks.
  2. Review the search results and identify any trademarks that are similar or identical to your proposed trademark. Pay attention to the goods and services listed for each trademark, as trademarks are typically registered for specific goods or services.
  3. If you identify any conflicting trademarks, review the details of the trademark registration to determine if it is still active and whether it covers the same or similar goods or services as your proposed trademark.
  4. Consider seeking the advice of a trademark attorney or agent to review the results of your trademark search and provide guidance on whether your proposed trademark is available for registration in Barbados.

It is important to conduct a thorough trademark search before applying for a trademark in Barbados to avoid potential conflicts with existing trademarks and to ensure that your trademark is available for registration.

b. Unregistrable trademarks in Barbados. 

In Barbados, there are certain types of trademarks that are considered unregistrable under the Trade Marks Act. These include:

  1. Trademarks that are not distinctive: A trademark that is not capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one business from those of another is not registrable.
  2. Trademarks that are contrary to public policy or morality: A trademark that is offensive, scandalous, or immoral is not registrable.
  3. Trademarks that are deceptive or misleading: A trademark that is likely to deceive the public, such as a false geographical indication or a trademark that falsely suggests a connection with a person, place or institution, is not registrable.
  4. Trademarks that are identical or confusingly similar to existing trademarks: A trademark that is identical or similar to an existing trademark, particularly if the existing trademark covers the same or similar goods or services, may not be registrable.
  5. Trademarks that are prohibited by law: A trademark that is prohibited by law, such as a trademark that contains a national flag or emblem, is not registrable.
  6. Trademarks that are descriptive: A trademark that merely describes the goods or services for which it is used is not registrable, unless it has acquired distinctiveness through use.
  7. Trademarks that are generic: A trademark that is the common name of the goods or services for which it is used is not registrable.

Please note that the list of unregistrable trademarks is not exhaustive, and the Barbados Intellectual Property Office has the discretion to refuse registration for any trademark that it considers to be inappropriate or in conflict with existing trademarks or laws.

4. Trademark Office in Barbados

The government agency responsible for the registration and management of trademarks in Barbados is the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO). CAIPO was established in 2007 through the merger of the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office.

CAIPO's responsibilities include the registration and management of trademarks, patents, industrial designs, and copyrights in Barbados. It provides services to individuals, businesses, and organizations seeking to register and manage their intellectual property rights in the country.

The Trademarks Division of CAIPO is responsible for the registration of trademarks in Barbados. This division is responsible for processing trademark applications, conducting trademark searches, and maintaining the trademark database in the country.

Trademark applicants in Barbados can apply for trademark registration online through the CAIPO website or by submitting a paper application to the Trademarks Division. The application process typically takes between 12 to 18 months, and it involves a substantive examination of the trademark application to determine if it meets the requirements for registration under the Trade Marks Act.

CAIPO plays a vital role in protecting the intellectual property rights of individuals, businesses, and organizations in Barbados. The agency is committed to promoting a business-friendly environment and supporting entrepreneurship and innovation in the country.

a. Address of the Trademark Office in Barbados.

The address of the trademark office in Barbados, specifically the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO), is as follows:

Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO)

Baobab Tower, Warrens,

St. Michael BB22026,

Barbados

Phone: (1 246) 535 2401, 2402, 2404

Fax:  (1 246) 535 2444

E-mail address: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

The CAIPO office is located in the Baobab Tower in the Warrens area of St. Michael, which is in the central part of the island. It is easily accessible by car or public transportation.

5. After Registration in Barbados. 

a. For how long is a mark valid?

In Barbados, a registered trademark is valid for an initial period of 10 years from the date of registration. The trademark owner may renew the registration for successive periods of 10 years each by filing a renewal application with the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) and paying the renewal fee.

It is the responsibility of the trademark owner to ensure that the renewal application is filed and the renewal fee is paid before the expiration of the current registration period. Failure to renew the trademark registration may result in the trademark being removed from the register, and the owner may lose the exclusive rights to use the trademark.

b. Trademark Registration Certificate.

In Barbados, a trademark registration certificate is issued by the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) once the trademark registration process has been completed successfully. The certificate serves as proof of ownership of the trademark and provides the trademark owner with exclusive rights to use the trademark in connection with the goods or services for which it is registered.

The trademark registration certificate includes important information about the trademark, such as the registration number, the date of registration, and the owner's name and address. It also specifies the goods or services for which the trademark is registered, as well as any limitations or conditions that may apply to the use of the trademark.

The trademark registration certificate is an important document that should be kept in a safe place, as it may be required as evidence of ownership in legal proceedings or in dealings with other businesses or organizations. If the trademark registration is renewed, a new certificate will be issued for each renewal period.

c. How to maintain your mark after registration?

After registering a trademark in Barbados, it is crucially important to maintain it to ensure that you retain your exclusive rights to use the trademark. Here are some key steps to take to maintain your trademark registration:

  1. Keep your contact information up to date: inform the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) of any changes to your name, address, or other contact information. This will ensure that you receive important notifications related to your trademark registration, such as renewal reminders.
  2. Monitor your trademark: Keep an eye out for any potential infringement of your trademark. Regularly search the market for unauthorized use of your trademark by other parties, and take appropriate action to stop any infringement.
  3. Renew your trademark registration: In Barbados, a trademark registration is valid for an initial period of 10 years, after which it can be renewed for successive periods of 10 years each. It is important to file a renewal application with CAIPO and pay the renewal fee before the expiry of the current registration period to maintain the registration.
  4. Use your trademark: To maintain your trademark registration, you must use the trademark in connection with the goods or services for which it is registered. Failure to use the trademark for an extended period of time may result in the trademark being vulnerable to cancellation.

Following these steps, you can maintain your trademark registration and protect your exclusive rights to use the trademark in Barbados.

6. Trademark Renewal in Barbados

a. How to renew a trademark in Barbados. 

To renew a trademark in Barbados, follow these steps:

1. Determine the renewal date: The renewal date is 10 years from the date of registration. You should mark this date in your calendar and ensure that you renew the trademark before it expires.

2. File a renewal application: You must file a renewal application with the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) before the expiration of the current registration period. The renewal application must be submitted on the prescribed form and include the following information:

  • The registration number of the trademark
  • The name and address of the trademark owner
  • The goods or services for which the trademark is registered
  • The renewal fee

3. Pay the renewal fee: The renewal fee must be paid at the time of filing the renewal application. The fee can be paid by cash, cheque, or online payment.

4. Await confirmation: After submitting the renewal application and paying the renewal fee, you will receive a confirmation from CAIPO that your trademark registration has been renewed. The renewal certificate will be issued after processing the renewal application.

By renewing your trademark registration in a timely manner, you avoid losing your exclusive rights to use the trademark. Failure to renew the trademark may result in it being removed from the register, and you may lose the protection afforded by the trademark registration.

7. F.A.Q. Trademarks in Barbados

a. Barbados trademark laws and Act.

The main law governing trademarks in Barbados is the Trade Marks Act, Cap 319, which provides for the registration and protection of trademarks in Barbados. The Act sets out the requirements for registration, the grounds for refusal or invalidity of registration, and the rights and remedies available to trademark owners.

Some of the key provisions of the Trade Marks Act in Barbados include:

  1. Definition of a trademark: The Act defines a trademark as any sign capable of being represented graphically, including words, names, logos, designs, letters, numerals, or a combination of these, used or intended to be used to distinguish goods or services of one undertaking from those of others.
  2. Registration requirements: To be eligible for registration, a trademark must be distinctive and not be similar or identical to any existing trademark in Barbados. The trademark owner must also file an application with the Corporate Affairs and Intellectual Property Office (CAIPO) and pay the prescribed fees.
  3. Grounds for refusal: The Act sets out various grounds on which a trademark application may be refused, including if the trademark is identical or confusingly similar to an existing trademark, if it is offensive or contrary to public policy, or if it is descriptive of the goods or services for which it is intended to be used.
  4. Protection of trademarks: Once a trademark is registered, the trademark owner has the exclusive right to use the trademark in connection with the goods or services for which it is registered. The Act also provides for various civil and criminal remedies for infringement of a trademark.
  5. Renewal and maintenance: A trademark registration is valid for 10 years from the date of registration, after which it can be renewed for successive periods of 10 years each. The Act sets out the requirements for renewing and maintaining a trademark registration.

These are just some of the key provisions of the Trade Marks Act in Barbados. It is recommended to consult the Act and seek professional legal advice to fully understand the requirements and implications of trademark registration and protection in Barbados.

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer.

Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. These cookies are set when you submit a form, login or interact with the site by doing something that goes beyond clicking on simple links.

We also use some non-essential cookies to anonymously track visitors or enhance your experience of the site. If you're not happy with this, we won't set these cookies but some nice features of the site may be unavailable.

By using our site you accept the terms of our Privacy Policy.

read more